Definition

Buyback clause

Buyback clause refers to a clause found in most founders’ agreement which legally obligates departing founders to sell to the remaining founders their interest in the firm if the remaining founders are interested. In most cases, the agreement also specifies the formula for computing the dollar value to be paid. The presence of a buyback clause is important for at least two reasons. First, if a founder leaves the firm, the remaining founders may need the shares to offer to a replacement person. Second, if founders leave because they are disgruntled, the buyback clause provides the remaining founders a mechanism to keep the shares of the firm in the hands of people who are fully committed to a positive future for the venture.

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