The
Definition Of

Publicly held corporation

Publicly held corporation is a corporation that may have thousands of stockholders and whose stock is regularly traded on a national securities exchange such as the New York Stock Exchange. Most of the largest U.S. corporations are publicly held. Examples of publicly held corporations are Intel, IBM, Caterpillar Inc., and General Electric.

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