The
Definition Of

The 1938 Fair Labor Standards Act

The Fair Labor Standards Act, originally passed in 1938 and since amended many times, covers most employees, contains minimum wage, maximum hours, overtime pay, equal pay, record keeping, and child labor provisions that are familiar to most working people. In addition, agricultural workers and those employed by certain larger retail and service companies are included.

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